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Vladimir Tatlin, “Monument to the Third International” (designed, c. 1920). Photo taken at the Royal Academy of Arts, London (Nov. 2011).
While I was in London a few of months ago, I was running down Piccadilly trying to make it to Regent Street before the shops closed so that I could return something. As I blitzed past the RA, the above piece caught my eye and I came to a screeching halt and turned around to go and take a closer look.
I recognized it from the smaller model that is (usually) at Moderna here in Stockholm, so I thought that it was really cool to see a larger version of it. I took a quick picture of the label and continued my flight towards Uniqlo. Now, three months later, I’ve only now got the whole story from the RA’s website. 
Long story short, someone decided to recreate Tatlin’s tower is a slightly smaller version since the original never made it past the model phase. The actual idea for the monument is pretty cool, i.e. a literal take on the Constructivist and Suprematism ideals of motion and progress. You can read more about it here, and if you’re in London before 29 January, you can take a look at it, too!

Vladimir Tatlin, “Monument to the Third International” (designed, c. 1920). Photo taken at the Royal Academy of Arts, London (Nov. 2011).

While I was in London a few of months ago, I was running down Piccadilly trying to make it to Regent Street before the shops closed so that I could return something. As I blitzed past the RA, the above piece caught my eye and I came to a screeching halt and turned around to go and take a closer look.

I recognized it from the smaller model that is (usually) at Moderna here in Stockholm, so I thought that it was really cool to see a larger version of it. I took a quick picture of the label and continued my flight towards Uniqlo. Now, three months later, I’ve only now got the whole story from the RA’s website. 

Long story short, someone decided to recreate Tatlin’s tower is a slightly smaller version since the original never made it past the model phase. The actual idea for the monument is pretty cool, i.e. a literal take on the Constructivist and Suprematism ideals of motion and progress. You can read more about it here, and if you’re in London before 29 January, you can take a look at it, too!